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JenniferLane

Jennifer Lane Books

Hi, I'm Jen, a psychologist/author (psycho author) in Columbus, Ohio. I write romantic suspense for adults and new adults. And I'm a voracious reader of romance and fiction. I love laughing, swimming, volleyball, and Grumpy Cat.

Currently reading

Standing at the Crossroads: Next Steps for High-Achieving Women
Patricia J. Ohlott, Marian N. Ruderman
The Space Between
Victoria H. Smith
Chasing Hope
Kathryn Cushman
Easy - Tammara Webber Easily a Five Star Read!

I’m loving this New Adult genre. College was one of the best times of my life and I enjoy reliving the experience through books like Easy.

Jacqueline is a college sophomore whose caddish boyfriend Kennedy recently dumped her. Mourning the end of their relationship, Jacqueline leaves a fraternity party early only to be assaulted by her ex’s frat brother Buck. Luckily, cutie boy Lucas rescues her and beats the snot out of the guy.

Lucas is tall, dark, and handsome with strong muscles and beautiful tattoos. He sits in the back of Jacqueline’s Econ class sketching in his notebook instead of paying attention. He’s a barista at Starbucks who owns a cat named Francis. And he’s a campus parking officer who helps the police teach a self-defense class. Yes, he has many talents.

When Jacqueline’s friend Erin suggests that she turn to Lucas as the perfect rebound, Jacqueline definitely considers “Operation Bad Boy Phase”. But Lucas seems to have secrets that make connecting difficult. Then there’s her Econ tutor Landon who is flirty and fun, combined with creepy Buck threatening to rape her when he gets the chance.

There’s wonderful world building of a college campus. Jacqueline has a sweet and funny guy who sits next to her in class, saying things like “I’ll take Hot Tutors for $200, Alex” when Jacqueline gets distracted in class. She blushes when she takes Lucas to her dorm room the first time:

I shook my head over the charming portrayal of a penis someone had doodled onto the whiteboard Erin and I used for notes to each other. Coed dorms were less mature than depicted on college websites. Sometimes it was like living with a bunch of twelve year olds.

I love Jacqueline’s best friend Erin. She always has Jacqueline’s back:

Erin: Do you still have your coffee cup?
Me: Yes?
Erin: Take the sleeve off
Me: OMG
Erin: His phone number?
Me: How did you know???
Erin: I’m Erin. I know all. ;-)
Erin: Actually, I just wondered why he wrote on your cup if he was going to make your drink.


Erin’s eagerness at the self-defense class is hilarious:

”So when do we get to the junk-kicking?” Erin asked.
Don shook his head and sighed. “I swear, there’s one in every class.”


When Lucas kisses her for the first time, I have to laugh at Jacqueline’s reaction:

If someone had asked, How does this compare to kissing Kennedy? I would have answered, “Who?”

I think the messages of this novel are empowering to women. Instead of being victims, many of these female characters learn to be survivors:

I gave myself credit for becoming a survivor. I had survived Kennedy’s decision to end our relationship. I had survived what Buck tried to do to me. Twice. And I would survive if Lucas wouldn’t – or couldn’t – trust me with his personal demons.

YEAH! And those personal demons are heartbreaking. Just what I like—a hero who’s emotionally wounded.

Nothing about the characters’ development or their relationships is easy, but this story is so easily likable. (Okay, sorry, enough with the easy references). I highly recommend this novel!